Error pages

Somewhere online, at some point, we've all bumped into an error page. Whenever you click a bad link, try to send invalid data, or many other things, the remote server responds with a message trying to tell you what's gone wrong. Many platforms, including Liftoff, enhance this response with a customized landing page that can include many other items beyond just the error response code itself.

To see an example of a default Liftoff error page, click here!

Here, we'll show you how you can control some of what your customers see when they encounter an error page on your Liftoff sites.

Customize your error pages

Begin by navigating in My Liftoff to Website > Error Pages.

Once there, you'll see that for each error type available, you can customize the description, the title, and the message. For each of these three fields, you can choose which messaging to change and which to leave as the default.

The messaging in these 3 fields is what appears by default.The messaging in these 3 fields is what appears by default.

The messaging in these 3 fields is what appears by default.

If you leave the default messaging intact, as in the image above, it looks like this when your customer lands on the Error 404 page:

If you change the messaging as below, remembering to save your changes...

...here's how it will look instead:

Your messaging doesn't have to be goofy, of course.Your messaging doesn't have to be goofy, of course.

Your messaging doesn't have to be goofy, of course.

Global error message

This is an optional area you can use to provide additional guidance to your customers when they encounter an error. It appears on all error pages, directly beneath the error messaging.

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HTML is OK

The Global Error Message field supports HTML input. However, please note that all HTML must be enclosed in <p> tags.

As an example, if you input the following into the Global Error Message field...

...this is how it looks to your customers:

Of course there are far better uses for global messaging.Of course there are far better uses for global messaging.

Of course there are far better uses for global messaging.

Contact override

A default error page contains a link at the bottom to the Contact page of your site.

However, if you place an email address into the Contact Override field...

...the link on your error pages changes to an email link so that customers can reach out to anyone you designate.